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Welcome to The-Grape-Vine.com featuring wine news from Milwaukee, Chicagoland, the Twin Cities, Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota and the entire Grape (Great) lakes Area.

Heard on the Grapevine by Wispering Jeff

By Jeffery Platt

Welcome to The-Grape-Vine.Com.This website is a collaboration between Michael Ratkowski of the Bacchus Wine Society and Cream City Suds, Wine & Spirits.

Several issues ago, Cream City Suds, a Midwestern beer newspaper since 1997,added Wine & Spirits to our mix. Our latest issues are now being delivered reflecting new names corresponding to our new direction: CREAM CITY SUDS+WINE & SPIRITS(Milwaukee & Wisconsin); WINDY CITY SUDS, WINE & SPIRITS (Chicagoland & Illinois) &SUDS, WINE & SPIRITS (Michigan, Minnesota, Indiana, Iowa, Ohio & Illinois).


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Clos du Bois Releases Deadhead Wine

By just-drinks.com editorial team

 

The Allied Domecq-owned winery Clos du Bois is launching a wine named after the Grateful Dead singer Jerry Garcia. The wines will be called J. Garcia wines and feature Garcia's artwork on its labels. Last week the company said that the first release to its distributors was already sold out. The initial release consists of 50,000 cases of 2002 Sonoma County Chardonnay, 2000 Sonoma County Merlot and 2000 Sonoma County Cabernet Sauvignon. A Zinfandel is expected later in the year. The launch was apparently the idea of members of the Garcia estate, who said he enjoyed drinking Clos du Bois.  Garcia went to school in Sonoma.

 

(c) 2003 Beer, Wine & Spirits Newsletter

 

Winemaker David Lake Celebrates

25th Harvest at Columbia Winery

 

Woodinville, WA - For more than 40 years, Columbia Winery has been a leading Washington state producer of high quality luxury wines and Master of Wine David Lake has been at the forefront of that effort for a quarter of a century.  The 2003 harvest marks a major milestone for Lake - his 25th harvest as winemaker at Columbia Winery. "I've had the privilege of working with the same vineyards for a quarter of a century, which provides an invaluable perspective of vintage seasons and vineyard potential," said David Lake, Columbia Winery winemaker, Master of Wine and head of Pacific Northwest Winemaking Operations for Canandaigua Wine Company.  "Even so, each year is still an evolving, dynamic learning process, and the fun and the freshness of exploration continues."

 

Often called the "Dean of Washington Winemakers," David Lake joined Columbia Winery as winemaker in 1979, just before harvest.  Over the past 25 years, he has guided the wines of Columbia Winery - and taken the winery to new heights.  For 20 years, Lake was the only Master of Wine making wine in North America. "In Washington, every vintage is unique," said Lake.  "The 2003 season has been extraordinary for the warmth of the summer, which threatened an early, short-duration crush. A very cool but dry weather pattern then intervened for ten days on September 9th and this has allowed flavor intensity and acid balance to catch up with the sugar levels in the grapes. The prospects now look excellent for outstanding quality wines as the fine weather resumes."

 

Lake is renowned for his experimentation with grape varieties and for producing the first vineyard-designated wines in Washington state.  He introduced several varietals in Washington state, including Syrah, Cabernet Franc and Pinot Gris.  Today, David continues to explore new varietals and new directions and to produce world-class wines.

Columbia Winery is a part of Canandaigua Wine, the popular and premium wine company of Constellation Wines, a division of Constellation Brands Inc.  Canandaigua Wine produces, markets and sells more than 40 well known brands. Leading table wine brands include Alice White, Almaden, Columbia Winery, Covey Run, Dunnewood, Inglenook, Talus and Vendange.  Constellation Brands is a leading international producer and marketer of beverage alcohol brands, with a broad portfolio across the wine, spirits and imported beer categories. The Company is the largest multi-category supplier of beverage alcohol in the United States; a leading producer and exporter of wine from Australia and New Zealand; and both a major producer and independent drinks wholesaler in the United Kingdom.

(c) 2003 Beer, Wine & Spirits Newsletter

 

Oversupply Of Better Quality Wine Sets Off Trend

By Maureen Fan for Mercury News, New York Bureau

 

Wine fans may have noticed a new Australian shiraz at Costco with a sleek silver-accented label for $9.99. It was the star of the holiday debut of Ballantrae Wine Merchants - a label most shoppers have probably never heard of. Ballantrae is Costco's own brand for wine, developed exclusively for the store by Winery Exchange of Novato. Soon, Costco will offer a limited amount of "collector'' cabernet from Napa and the Alexander Valley for $19.99 under the same label.

 

Like Costco, a small but growing number of retailers are cultivating their own brands -- or "private labels'' -- for wine, thanks to a bumper year of grape production and a growing sophistication in wine marketing. It's a strategy that allows wineries to get rid of surplus wine, gives retailers a chance to draw new audiences and could increase the bargains for consumers. "It's not the old model of just take some bulk wine, stick it in a bottle and slap a label on it,'' said Peter Byck, chief executive of Winery Exchange.  "It's working very closely with the retailer to develop brands for their customers and for them.''

 

For years, retailers have put house labels on cheap overstock that happens to come on the market. But with the new generation of private labels, retailers work with winemakers to develop and market their own custom blends -- usually of better quality than the old bulk overstock. Winemakers can work with retailers this way because there was a glut of better quality wine from 2002 production. For example, at Texas supermarket chain HEB, a private label known as Tellurian includes a California cabernet, a Chilean merlot, a New Zealand sauvignon blanc and an Australian chardonnay.

 

The glut follows a severe shortage of wine in the mid-'90s, when many wineries were forced to import foreign "juice'' to make up for low stocks. Since then, in a typical industry cycle, California growers have planted 275,000 acres of new wine grapes -- which have ripened into an oversupply. It's the kind of market that creates new trends such as private labels, said San Mateo wine consultant Jon Fredrickson, an adviser to Winery Exchange. "It's something that's exclusive, which is appealing to stores,'' he said.

For wineries, it gets rid of extra wine and the headache of selling it. "Let them (the stores) worry about the merchandising and marketing,'' said Reed Foster, co-founder and chairman emeritus of Ravenswood Winery in Sonoma, which started doing private labels even before the glut. "Get it in the store.''

 

Wineries also benefit when more people learn to drink wine through more accessible labels, he said. Sales of private label wine increased more than 26 percent over the past year to $15.6 million, according to figures cited from Information Resources, a Chicago research company. That's just 1-3% of the U.S. market. Compared with the United Kingdom, where private labels make up nearly 50% of the market, it appears there's plenty of room to grow, winemakers say. At Whole Foods, a $10 wine named after a dog hit stores last week. But Pumari is not just any dog. The canine belongs to the family at Robert Talbot Vineyards, a Monterey vintner of $45 chardonnays and $35 pinot noirs, said Marc Jonna, national wine buyer for Whole Foods. Whole Foods bought the entire production of some of the vineyard's less expensive wines, which normally retail for $15 or $16 a bottle.

 

"This is a control label wine, something we've bought the control of for this year,'' Jonna said. "Consumers used to be afraid of private label and control label wine. They thought it was bad wine being pushed out. It's totally changed now because there's a lot of wine out there.'' Also behind the private label trend is sophisticated marketing to a growing audience of wine drinkers. Private labels, if marketed right, can help a wine stand out amid the increasing competition from international wines appearing all over for about $10 a bottle, said Stephen Schelke, director of business development at Signature Wines of Hayward. "You focus on the placement of the wine in the store, you have clerks educate consumers about which wines work well with turkey and chicken, you get the price point right and win some awards,'' he said. Winery Exchange conducts market research, visits wineries with a retailer, selects or creates an exclusive blend and helps the retailer market it -- including package design and positioning statements. The company works with grocery giants such as Albertson's, Safeway and Kroger, among others.

 

 The private label strategy comes with risks, and not every retailer is going this route. Target, the large discount retailer, is testing sales of brand name wines in Northern California and some Super Target stores across the country. "What resonates most with our guests is brand name labels or brand names on wines,'' said spokesman Doug Kline.

And Trader Joe's has done well this season with a low-end overstock wine known as "two-buck Chuck,'' the nickname for the popular Charles Shaw wine priced at $1.99. While Trader Joe's is the exclusive distributor, the label belongs to Bronco Wine.

 

The private label strategy could also suffer if there is another shortage, and winemakers go back to building their own brands rather than creating new ones for retailers. But experts like Schelke and Jonna said they don't expect another shortage soon because of smarter wine production and the free trade environment. "There are plenty of people who are going to say, 'I'll never buy a private label wine,' because they can't let go of the connotation that private label means inconsistency or lower quality,'' Schelke said. ``But time will probably prove them wrong.''

ILLINOIS WINE LOVERS NEWS

 by Brian Gustafson

 Greetings, fellow wine enthusiasts, and those who would like to venture into a new genre of taste sensations. Welcome to Illinois Wine Lover's News inaugural column, which in the coming months will attempt to report on all things grape-wise, including demystifying wine styles, what's happening at Illinois 35 vineyards, the scoop on wine tastings and festivals, and anything else that might be connected with the pull of a cork. In this column, we'll take a short look at one of the America's favorite wines for this time of year, the classic Chardonnay. According to the Wine Spectator's web site, "Chardonnay is the king of the white wines, for it makes consistently excellent, rich and complex whites. This is an amazingly versatile grape that grows well in a variety of locations throughout the world.

Chardonnay was introduced to California in the 1930s but didn't become popular until the 1970s. Areas such as Anderson Valley, Carneros, Monterey, Russian River, Santa Barbara and Santa Maria Valley, all closer to cooler maritime influences, are now producing wines far superior to those made a decade ago. When well made, Chardonnay offers bold, ripe, rich and intense fruit flavors of apple, fig, melon, pear, peach, pineapple, lemon and grapefruit, along with spice, honey, butter, butterscotch and hazelnut flavors. No other white table wine benefits as much from oak aging or barrel fermentation."

VALENTINO VINEYARDS in Long Grove, Illinois, has recently added a private Friday night wine tasting dinners for parties of 20 or more, serving food prepared by Head Chef Briana DiTommaso, as well as new tasting glasses featuring the Valentino logo. These glasses can be purchased by themselves at $5.00 each, or each guest doing a wine tasting will receive a logo glass along with the purchase of a $7.00 tasting session. Valentino has added another 700 new vines, bring the total to over 5000.

The varieties added include Sangiovese, Pinot Noir, Merlot and St. Pippin, which is a seldom seen grape used in making white wines.

Since we wrote about Valentino last summer, the Vineyard has added fourteen new medals to it's collection - six from the 2002 Indy International Wine Competition (four silvers and two bronze), and eight from the Illinois State Fair Competition (1 gold, six silver and one bronze.) That brings the total of medals won by this vineyard to 21 in just under two years. The 2003 competitions are just a few weeks away and Winemaker / Owner Rudy DiTommaso, Jr. expects to take home more silvers and at least another gold this year

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Dancing Wienies

Enjoying wine with outdoor grilled foods

By Michael David Ratkowski

"I'm a man. Men cook outside. Women make the three-bean salad. That's the way it is and always has been, since the first settlers of Levittown. That outdoor grilling is a manly pursuit has long been beyond question. If this wasn't firmly understood, you'd never get grown men to put on those aprons with pictures of dancing wienies and things on the front and messages like 'Come 'n' Get It' …

............... William Geist, New York Times Magazine

Aprons adorned with promenading frankfurters notwithstanding and regardless of whether the cook be “homme ou femme” that wonderfully, spicy/smoky outdoor grilling season is in full swing and it’s a great time to pull a few corks! Don’t be duped by the old myth that wine is only for swanky food and that you have to serve cola, beer or one of those malternatives with outdoor grilled fare. Wine is just as easy to enjoy outdoors as it is indoors. With a bit of well thought-out selecting, it can be a perfect match for virtually all cookout fare – from burgers to barbecued chicken, possum or iguana (on second thought we’ve better forget the possum and iguana). A good wine match can contribute mightily to the success of any outdoor cookout, whether it’s an intimate din-din “à deux, un mélange de trois, or une grande celebration” with family and friends.

I have been enjoying wine my entire adult life, I have been involved in the wine trade for nearly thirty years and I still get a kick a discovering a great food and wine partnership. I just cannot resist the challenge of paring wine with other than standard food flavors. While bookstore shelves have a lot of wine guides that will help point you to a nice Chardonnay to go with poached chicken breast in tangerine sauce they offer scant help when it comes to picking wine to accompany Mesquite grilled kielbasa with African bird Pepper, Mongolian fire oil or wasabi mustard sauce. Though it may appear that matching wine to the slightly atypical flavors of outdoor grilled fare, with all of the smokiness and often-unusual spicy-hot sauces would be difficult - it in reality is not. It has often been said that food and wine get along together for much the same reasons that people do; they share comparable tastes, they have a need for each other or that long-standing axiom, ‘opposites attract’ comes into play.

Pairing food and wines with mutual flavors can be an easy way to form a good accompaniment. For example: I have found that many Australian Chardonnays have a unique smoky edge and go very well with simply grilled (without highly-flavored sauces) seafood or fowl. Food lathered with a tomato based sauce, which are quite acidic calls for wine that, is acidic, perhaps a Chianti or a California wine made from the Grignolino grape, Heitz Cellars makes a good one. A full-bodied and flavored red with a bit of tannin is called for steak and burgers. When using this strategy, you of course pair delicate flavored wines with delicate flavored foods and robust wines with robust flavored foods.  However when the robustness goes over-the-top, like in the case of hot and spicy barbeque sauce, it’s time to switch strategies. Look for some balance and apply the “opposites attract” axiom. Foods grilled with hot and spicy sauces will benefit from a fruit-forward, light-bodied red wine without a lot of tannins, or even chilled fruity whites and rosés. I will often serve a wine, which has a little sweetness with hot and spicy food. Ask any champion chili pepper eater and he will tell that a teaspoon of sugar will soothe the tastes buds more than a any amount of water, try a well chilled German spätlese with those fiery sauces.

Of course the one over riding rule when selecting wine for any occasion is; always select the wine you personally like. Here are a few suggestions for wines to serve with outdoor grilled foods. All of these wines are available locally.

Steak or Burgers

Grilled steak and beef burgers are truly classic outdoor fare, and by far easiest to pair with wine. For an ideal match find a big red with, fruit, tannin and a dry finish.

• 2000 St. Francis “Old Vines” Zinfandel, Sonoma County  ($20.99) - Classic brambly fruit, full-blown Zin. A lot of everything and all in balance with nice a long finish.

 • 1994 Marqués de Cáceres, Gran Reserva, Rioja, Spain ($26.99) – This recently released 1994 is huge! With layers and layers of complex, ripe plum, spice, chocolate and vanilla flavors. The heady perfumed nose alone is almost worth price.

 Chicken

Simply prepared grilled chicken basted with orange, lemon or lime juice and herbed olive oil is always a hit with guests. Chardonnay goes nicely with most grilled chicken.

 • 2002 Wolf Blass Chardonnay, South Australia ($10.99) - Luscious with a hint of toasty, smoky oak, a touch of peach and melon fruit and a long refreshing finish.

 • 2002 Georges Dubceuf, Poully-Fuissé, Prestige, France ($19.99)  - This elegant Chardonnay from France features vanilla and toasted almond flavors and a aromas of citrus and white flowers. Chardonnays from Burgundy in general harmonize better with food because of their higher natural acidity.

Salmon

Grilled salmon can be paired with red, white or dry rosé. Salmon is great on the grill, It doesn't dry out easily when cooked on a fire.

 • 2000 Seghesio, Keyhole Ranch, Pinot Noir, Russian River, California ($20.99) – A stunning full-flavored Pinot. The bouquet is incredibly sexy and verdant with a hint of fresh herbs and soupcon of cinnamon. The taste is smooth and the finish dry

 • 1998 Chateau Romain, Coteaux du Zaccar, Algeria ($7.99) – This Rhone-style blend from North Africa is made with a major portion of Grenache grapes. Its soft, dry, bright fruity taste is very easy to like and matches well with a wide range of food.

 Shrimp

 I love shrimp on the grill and they are easy and quick to do. There are oodles of great marinades that work well with scrimp. The key is to keep them moving on the grill and to cook them for only five minutes. Whites with a little spiciness go well with shrimp.

 • 2002 Don David, Torrontes, Argentina ($17.49) – This exotic wine is truly something else. Elegant, rich and crisp with exuberant tropical fruit flavors, and vibrant floral aromas

• 2002 Domaine Du Mage, Cote de Gascogne, France ($8.99) – This versatile country wine from southwestern France may well be one the best buys in white wine you will ever find. Made from Ungi Blanc and Colombard grapes, it is light, fresh, dry and brimming with citrus fruit.

Sundry Spicy Sausages and Sauces

2002 Wollersheim Prairie Fumé, Seyval, Wisconsin ($8.99) A exceptionally well made, undemanding, semi-sweet white that even people who do not like wine - like.

NV Salmon Run, Coho Red, New York State, ($7.59) a simple, semi-sweet wine from an awarding winning producer with a devoted following.

One last side note:  Have you ever wondered where this great old America tradition, the Barbecue came from? Did it start on some Texas ranch? Hope, as did so many other symbols of our country’s personality (like Fries, the Statue of Liberty and our Flag’s colors) it came from France. The word barbeque or barbecue is derived from the French, “barbe-a-queue “ meaning from beard to tail. The term was used to describe the grilling of a whole animal.

 

Warm Hearts And Cool Lafite

By Michael David Ratkowski

There is an old Polish proverb that states: “The correct temperature of a home is maintained by warm hearts not by hotheads”. The correct temperature is critical to all of the human experiences. Temperature affects our comfort, our disposition, the very way that our bodies function, our ability to think and our sensual perceptions. It’s these sensual readings (feel, taste and smell) and their role in the appreciation of wine; we’ll talk about here.

 Have you ever enjoyed a really great bottle of wine at a restaurant, only to find that the next time that you ordered it or served it at home, it tasted somehow different? While many factors come in to play here, serving temperature is the most likely and the most often over looked. The temperature at which a wine is served is vitally important to its enjoyment. The long-standing axiom of serving white wines chilled and red wines at room temperature is a good starting point, though it isn’t sufficiently precise. A wine served just a tad too cold or a smidgen too warm can lose a great deal of its character and enjoy ability. Temperature can affect wine in several ways, it’s taste, mouth feel and of course it’s all-important bouquet.

 It is conventional wisdom that Americans drink their white wines too cold and their red wines too warm. This is probably true and it may be cultural. When you tell an American to chill a bottle, he immediately thinks of icing it down to the max. Much the way he would a soft drink or mass-market light beer. When you suggest serving a wine at ‘room temperature’, he thinks of the warm comfort of today's insulated, centrally heated houses.

Both, of course are not applicable when it comes to serving wine.  Refrigerators maintain an internal temperature of approximately 38ºF, which is way too cold for serving most white wines. Champagne and fine dry white wines are best when served at a temperature in the neighborhood of 45ºF to 50ºF. If you are chilling these types of wines in a refrigerator, just one hour will usually yield satisfactory results. Red wines frequently also require a slight chilling. The often-recommended 'room temperature' is actually about 57°F to 62°F, rather cooler than one might find in our modern houses, though this was a not an uncommon room temperature a century or so ago. Red wines, if not cellared somewhere cool, will profit from half an hour in the refrigerator. This is particularly the case for Beaujolais and young Burgundies, also for many Oregon and Washington State Pinot Noirs

If you are unsure about the correct serving temperature, always serve the wine a bit too cold. The wine will soon warm in the glass. Cradling your hands around the glass will also help to warm the wine. Conversely there is not a simple way of cooling a wine, which was served too warm. It is considered gauche to pop a cube in your Bâtard-Montrachet.

I have listed a variety of wines and the temperatures at which I would serve them. This list is by no means complete nor I suspect, immune from other wine dudes taking some exceptions to. That’s fine; matters of taste are more subjective than objective.

 62°F to 65°F

California Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, Australian Shiraz, Red Rhone Wines, Vintage Port, Red Bordeaux, Châeauneuf-du-Pape, South African Pinotage, Chilean, and Australian Cabernet, Algerian red wine

 57°F to 61°F

Spanish Rioja, Red Côte d'Or, Burgundy, southern French Reds, southern Italian reds, Australian and California Pinot Noir, Tawny and Ruby Ports, Italian and Washington State Cabernet Sauvignon, young Chianti, Valpolicella

53°F to 56°F

Young Beaujolais, red Sancerre, Bardolino, young Spanish and Portuguese reds, red vin de pays, Côte Chalonnaise, red Zinfandel, Oregon Pinot Noir, Oloroso, Cream sherries, and Madeira, Wollersheim Ruby Nouveau

49°F to 52°F

California and Australian Chardonnay, Sauternes, white Côte d'Or Burgundy, sweeter German Wines, Tokay, Australian liqueur Muscat, white Rioja, Fino and Amontillado Sherries, Maderia, white Port, Wollersheim Prairie Fumé

 45°F to 48°F

White Pessac-Léognan and Graves, north-eastern Italian whites, Washington State Chardonnay, Chilean Chardonnay, Australian Semillon, Alsace, Chablis, Côte Chalonnaise and Mâconnais whites, dry German wines, Franken wines, Australian Riesling, Cabernet and Grenache rosé Good Champagne and Sparkling wine, Sancerre, Chilean and New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc

40°F to 44°F

White Bordeaux, Muscadet, Anjou, other Sauvignons, Asti, Qba German wines, Soave, young Spanish and Portuguese whites, Vinho Verde, white zinfandel, sweet Door County cherry wine

Below 39° F

Tastes buds become anesthetized at this temperature. I would only serve cheap sparkling wine, wine coolers, and malt alternatives this cold.

 

 

Owner ~ The Market Basket ~ Brookfield, Wisconsin

 

There is an old Polish proverb that states: “The correct temperature of a home is maintained by warm hearts not by hotheads”. The correct temperature is critical to all of the human experiences. Temperature affects our comfort, our disposition, the very way that our bodies function, our ability to think and our sensual perceptions. It’s these sensual readings (feel, taste and smell) and their role in the appreciation of wine; we’ll talk about here.

 

Have you ever enjoyed a really great bottle of wine at a restaurant, only to find that the next time that you ordered it or served it at home, it tasted somehow different? While many factors come in to play here, serving temperature is the most likely and the most often over looked. The temperature at which a wine is served is vitally important to its enjoyment. The long-standing axiom of serving white wines chilled and red wines at room temperature is a good starting point, though it isn’t sufficiently precise. A wine served just a tad too cold or a smidgen too warm can lose a great deal of its character and enjoy ability. Temperature can affect wine in several ways, it’s taste, mouth feel and of course it’s all-important bouquet.

 

It is conventional wisdom that Americans drink their white wines too cold and their red wines too warm. This is probably true and it may be cultural. When you tell an American to chill a bottle, he immediately thinks of icing it down to the max. Much the way he would a soft drink or mass-market light beer. When you suggest serving a wine at ‘room temperature’, he thinks of the warm comfort of today's insulated, centrally heated houses.

Both, of course are not applicable when it comes to serving wine.

Refrigerators maintain an internal temperature of approximately 38ºF, which is way too cold for serving most white wines. Champagne and fine dry white wines are best when served at a temperature in the neighborhood of 45ºF to 50ºF. If you are chilling these types of wines in a refrigerator, just one hour will usually yield satisfactory results. Red wines frequently also require a slight chilling. The often-recommended 'room temperature' is actually about 57°F to 62°F, rather cooler than one might find in our modern houses, though this was a not an uncommon room temperature a century or so ago. Red wines, if not cellared somewhere cool, will profit from half an hour in the refrigerator. This is particularly the case for Beaujolais and young Burgundies, also for many Oregon and Washington State Pinot Noirs

If you are unsure about the correct serving temperature, always serve the wine a bit too cold. The wine will soon warm in the glass. Cradling your hands around the glass will also help to warm the wine. Conversely there is not a simple way of cooling a wine, which was served too warm. It is considered gauche to pop a cube in your Bâtard-Montrachet.

I have listed a variety of wines and the temperatures at which I would serve them. This list is by no means complete nor I suspect, immune from other wine dudes taking some exceptions to. That’s fine; matters of taste are more subjective than objective.

 62°F to 65°F

California Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, Australian Shiraz, Red Rhone Wines, Vintage Port, Red Bordeaux, Châeauneuf-du-Pape, South African Pinotage, Chilean, and Australian Cabernet, Algerian red wine

 

57°F to 61°F

Spanish Rioja, Red Côte d'Or, Burgundy, southern French Reds, southern Italian reds,

Australian and California Pinot Noir, Tawny and Ruby Ports, Italian and Washington State Cabernet Sauvignon, young Chianti, Valpolicella

 

53°F to 56°F

Young Beaujolais, red Sancerre, Bardolino, young Spanish and Portuguese reds, red vin de pays, Côte Chalonnaise, red Zinfandel, Oregon Pinot Noir, Oloroso, Cream sherries, and Madeira, Wollersheim Ruby Nouveau

 

49°F to 52°F

California and Australian Chardonnay, Sauternes, white Côte d'Or Burgundy, sweeter German Wines, Tokay, Australian liqueur Muscat, white Rioja, Fino and Amontillado Sherries, Maderia, white Port, Wollersheim Prairie Fumé

 

45°F to 48°F

White Pessac-Léognan and Graves, north-eastern Italian whites, Washington State Chardonnay, Chilean Chardonnay, Australian Semillon, Alsace, Chablis, Côte Chalonnaise and Mâconnais whites, dry German wines, Franken wines, Australian Riesling, Cabernet and Grenache rosé Good Champagne and Sparkling wine, Sancerre, Chilean and New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc

 

40°F to 44°F

White Bordeaux, Muscadet, Anjou, other Sauvignons, Asti, Qba German wines, Soave, young Spanish and Portuguese whites, Vinho Verde, white zinfandel, sweet Door County cherry wine

 

Below 39° F

Tastes buds become anesthetized at this temperature. I would only serve cheap sparkling wine, wine coolers, and malt alternatives this cold.

 

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